Meadowlands
Can beavers restore this eroded stream channel?

Oregon State University - February 7, 2017

WHEN BEAVERS BUILD DAMS, streams slow down, sediment accumulates and ponds grow. Meadows are born. Water nurtures new vegetation, a boon for wildlife and livestock.

But without beavers, streams speed up, scour channels and turn into gullies. Meadows dry out. Willows, sedges and other wetland vegetation give way to drought-tolerant shrubs.




Restoring Rivers, Sustaining Communities

Science Update - Issue #23 / Fall 2016

Water is the most critical resource issue of our lifetime and our children’s lifetime. The health of our waters is the principal measure of how we live on the land.
—Luna Leopold, hydrologist




Work in eastern Oregon is tied to the land: Guest opinion Published in the Oregonian Jan 31, 2014

Sustainable land use can pull rural Oregon out of poverty

By John Audley, President, Sustainable Northwest, and Scott Campbell, DVM, Silvies Valley Ranch

At the December Leadership Summit, Oregon business leaders placed poverty reduction on par with other economic priorities for the state. The Oregonian editorial board echoed this call, arguing that the time is right to take on this challenge. We agree, and in fact believe the call is long past due. But in many instances the remedies for poverty in rural areas differ dramatically with those required in our population centers. In eastern Oregon, solving this problem will depend largely upon our ability to put people back to work in a natural resource-based economy....




 

Silvies Valley Ranch Announces New Key Addition

We are very happy to extend a warm western welcome to Colby Marshall who has joined our ranch family as Vice President responsible for Livestock and Guest Services.

Colby and his family moved to the Silvies Valley Ranch in December and he began taking on his new responsibilities at the first of the year. Colby has deep roots in eastern Oregon, growing up on the Broken Circle Ranch located twenty-seven miles southwest of Burns, Oregon. Colby graduated from Burns High School and Oregon State University. He worked for United States Congressman Greg Walden for over ten years, starting out in the central Oregon field office and eventually becoming the Deputy Chief-of-Staff. Over a decade Colby helped direct Representative Walden’s team on natural resource and energy policies that affect ranching, helping thousands of people every year...